State and Local Officials Stress Need for Better Coordination to Target Cyber Disruptions

Shutterstock

 

Connecting state and local government leaders

Training, technology and partnerships are critical to infrastructure defense, according to a new white paper, but do encryption and privacy concerns really stand in government’s way?

Cybersecurity was listed a “top challenge” in the 2016 National Issues Brief released in April, representing a growing concern among the 22 organizations comprising the National Homeland Security Consortium.

The National Emergency Management Association, International City / County Management Association and National Association of State Chief Information Officers all endorsed the white paper highlighting the “highly technical” threat.

Sufficiently trained cyber personnel and cross-sector collaboration are high priorities for the state, local and private officials’ worried about cyber disruptions—causing or coinciding with natural disasters—according to the brief:

The physical consequences of a cyber-attack, particularly on our critical infrastructure and interdependent systems, would be significant and could stress even the most prepared jurisdictions. Managing the consequences of a cyber-attack requires cooperation and coordination among many disparate agencies and the private sector. Federal, state and local governments, and the private sector should work together to generate sound policy solutions, operational coordination, and mutually agreed upon objectives that ensure the security of connected networks and systems without sacrificing privacy and economic values.

NASCIO, as Route Fifty reported, recently issued a Cyber Disruption Response Planning guidance for states and is also pushing for their governments to develop advanced cyber analytics.

With cyber attacks constantly evolving, states must facilitate data sharing between their agencies’ security tools.

“In the future, advanced persistent threats will become more and more sophisticated,” Doug Robinson, NASCIO’s executive director, said in a statement. “States must move away from merely waiting for the next attack and respond to a more predictive stance in anticipating attacks so they can put necessary defense in place in advance.”

Connecticut, Illinois, Louisiana, Nevada and Oregon will develop a comprehensive, implementable cybersecurity plan during a policy academy announced Thursday by the National Governors Association. The NGA created the Governors Homeland Security Advisors Council, another sponsor of the issues brief.

NGA’s policy academy will look at better safeguarding communications networks, databases, and payment and tax system critical infrastructure, as well as prosecuting cyber crimes.

“Cyber threats affect everyone from law enforcement, public works and energy agencies, to financial and communications sectors and ultimately, citizens of every state,” Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, who co-chairs NGA’s Resource Center for State Cybersecurity, said in the announcement. “This policy academy will help states develop strategic plans to enhance their cybersecurity capabilities and improve incident response planning.”

The white paper argues new encryption methods and privacy and transparency concerns have hindered the adoption of cyber technology and intelligence sharing.

In April, the Major Cities Chiefs Association, which is part of the National Homeland Security Consortium, threw its support behind a new bipartisan encryption bill that came out of the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee, the Compliance With Court Orders Act of 2016. The legislation grants law enforcement access to encrypted data at U.S. companies and service providers, and opponents argue it effectively outlaws encryption altogether.

“The recent attacks in Paris and San Bernardino demonstrate the urgent need to grant law enforcement lawful access to cell phone data in criminal and terrorist cases,” MCCA President J. Thomas Manger, who is chief of the Montgomery County, Maryland, police department, said in the announcement. “We support the proposed legislation that grants access to encrypted information and will lead law enforcement to victims in danger and the criminals who would do them harm.”

MCCA also put out a report lamenting law enforcement “rapidly losing the capability to lawfully obtain information necessary to protect the public from crime and violence.”

Law enforcement agencies aren’t the only ones worried about cybersecurity. A representative for the International Association of Fire Chiefs, which is another National Homeland Security Consortium member, testified before the U.S. House Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection and Security Technologies of the Committee on Homeland Security in April..

The fire chief in Plano, Texas, Sam Greif, requested Congress put $45.6 million in federal funds toward first responder cyber threat education, in addition to grants promoting fusion center operations.

“Cybercrime and cyber attacks are becoming a more prevalent threat to the American homeland,” Greif said in his testimony. “However, the fire and emergency service is just beginning to recognize how these threats can affect our operations.”

Dave Nyczepir is a News Editor at Government’s Executive’s Route Fifty.

FEATURED CASE STUDIES
Powered By The Atlas
West Allis, WI consolidates IT, sees 30% efficiency increase
West Allis, WI, USA
Online permitting and approval process during COVID-19 exceeds in-person performance numbers
Markham, ON, Canada
Hurst, TX reduces the cost of service requests to less than $0.60 per interaction
Hurst, TX, USA

NEXT STORY: The Internet of Things and Cities: A Billion Points of Policy

X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.