Law Enforcement

Teens say distracted driving messages need to be catchier, more frequent and blunt

Young adults typically underestimate the risk of distracted driving, making it difficult for public safety officials to craft effective messaging.

White nationalist, anti-LGBTQ activity on the rise, annual hate report shows

Much of the increase in hate and extremism can be attributed to a 50% surge in white supremacy hate groups in 2023, the highest jump ever recorded by the Southern Poverty Law Center.

Amid campus protests nationwide, DC’s response stands out

The capital city’s police department cleared an encampment at a local university following pressure from House Republicans to be more forceful. But the District’s reluctance to take action sooner underlies lessons officials learned decades ago about the perils of aggressive enforcement.

As cities ban them from public spaces, homeless people scatter in search of refuge

Attorneys say bans could become more common nationwide if the U.S. Supreme Court overturns lower-court rulings in Oregon and Idaho that protect homeless people from being ticketed, charged or arrested for sleeping on public property.

States are required to background check child care workers. Many are falling short.

Dozens of states are out of compliance with at least one component of a federal law’s requirements, a congressional report found. But the problems are so complicated, it’s unclear if anyone has a solution.

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In reversal, more areas allow high-speed police chases

Supporters of policy rollbacks say police pursuits can reduce crime; some experts aren’t so sure.

Oregon rolls back decriminalization of drugs. But is it too soon?

At a time when drug overdoses plague the nation, Oregon will recriminalize hard drugs, walking back a first-in-the nation experiment that critics say the state botched.

One city's long and historic lawsuit against the gun industry appears to have met its end

After surviving 25 years of appeals, Gary, Indiana's efforts to hold firearm manufacturers responsible for illegal gun sales is likely over after the governor signed a bill aimed at extinguishing the suit.

‘Tough-on-crime’ policies are back in some places that had reimagined criminal justice

Several states are considering or have already enacted legislation undoing more progressive policies.

N.Y. governor sends National Guard troops into subway to tackle the “psychology of crime”

The New York governor's supporters say the specter of National Guard troops checking bags will make New Yorkers feel safer, but activists say it’s just a militarized version of stop-and-frisk.

As xylazine surges, some lawmakers want jail time for dealers and people who use the drug

The animal sedative is cheap, easy to get and sometimes winds up in other illicit substances.

Chicago is the latest city rethinking disputed technology that listens for gunshots

More than 150 U.S. cities use ShotSpotter, but a growing body of research shows that the tool has not succeeded in reducing gun violence, has slowed police response times to emergency calls and often did not lead to evidence recovery.

Philly mayor might consider these lessons from NYC before expanding stop-and-frisk

In New York City, stop-and-frisk led to unwanted consequences, such as lawsuits against the city, greater racial disparities in the criminal justice system, citizen unrest and distrust of the police.

City extends police department’s ‘life changing’ 4-day workweek pilot

The decision comes after the data shows that the 32-hour workweek resulted in faster emergency response times and cost savings

Policies to expand access to psychedelics could be ‘short-sighted’

While research shows psychedelics’ potential to mitigate the effects of substance use disorders, observers warn states might be better off waiting for federal guidance before legalizing their use and possession.

Cities know that the way police respond to mental crisis calls must change. But how?

Cities are experimenting with new ways to meet the rapidly increasing demand for behavioral health crisis intervention, at a time when incidents of police shooting and killing people in mental health crisis have become painfully familiar.

Active shooter training: State-specific requirements for schools and law enforcement

No states mandate annual active shooter training for police officers, according to an analysis by The Texas Tribune, ProPublica and FRONTLINE. In comparison, at least 37 states require such training in schools, typically on a yearly basis.

Car thefts and carjackings are up. Unreliable data makes it hard to pinpoint why.

Experts caution against making policy based on anecdotal evidence on social media.

Police departments are turning to AI to sift through millions of hours of unreviewed body-cam footage

Body camera video equivalent to 25 million copies of “Barbie” is collected but rarely reviewed. Some cities are looking to new technology to examine this stockpile of footage to identify problematic officers and patterns of behavior.

Does your state have strict gun laws? Chances are it saw a drop in gun homicides.

A new analysis from the left-leaning Center for American Progress says there is a correlation between a state’s gun laws and its shooting homicides.