Oklahoma

A Model for Reducing Female Incarceration and Breaking the Generational Cycle

A program in Tulsa, Oklahoma, has been changing lives for addicted women and their children. Here’s how it works.

A State Wildlife Agency That's Winning at Twitter

Oklahoma's Department of Wildlife Conservation has grown its follower count from around 8,000 to over 80,000, dishing out posts that are fun but also informative. The agency's social media team chatted with Route Fifty about the secrets to their success.

The Growing Movement to Halt Executions in Conservative States

Right-leaning activists are speaking out against the death penalty, saying capital punishment is morally wrong, fails to deter crime and is flawed in other ways as well.

State Officials Resist Supreme Court Ruling Affirming Tribal Authority Over American Indian Country

COMMENTARY | Local governments in Oklahoma are adapting to a 2020 Supreme Court ruling, but state officials have chosen a different path.

Collaboration Provides Effective Approach to State's Human Services

Oklahoma is on the cutting edge of a national trend bringing foundations, nonprofits and the Department of Human Services together to help residents in need.

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Idaho and Oklahoma Expected To Be First States To Pass Texas-inspired Six-week Abortion Bans

Clinics say they are preparing for bans to take effect as early as April. Texas offers a preview of what might happen if those bills go into effect.

Black People Killed by Police at More Than Twice the Rate of Whites

An analysis of police violence also shows that the National Vital Statistics System misclassified and underreported about 55% of the estimated deaths by law enforcement for nearly 30 years.

U.S. Covid-19 Testing Has Dropped Dramatically

Nationwide, COVID-19 testing has decreased by a third in the past two months, causing public health experts to worry they could miss future surges.

States Join Pilot to Investigate Cases of Missing and Murdered Indigenous People

Federal, state, and tribal agencies will create guidelines for investigations into missing persons and murder cases where Native American or Alaska Native people are involved.

Two-Decade Push to Build a Grocery in a Food Desert Finally Pays Off

A mix of public and private support has come together to make the project in northeast Oklahoma City possible.

Philadelphia Imposes Curfew, Calls National Guard to Quell Violence Over Police Shooting

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Thousands in Oklahoma City are without power after an autumn ice storm… The Justice Department launches probe of New Jersey veterans’ homes… New study says a flu shot could reduce the risk of catching Covid-19.

Tulsa Unearths Mass Grave in Search for Race Massacre Victims

This week is the second time this year the city has dug for lost victims of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and the first time they’ve found something.

Supreme Court Rules Nearly Half of Oklahoma is Native American Land

The full implications of the ruling on criminal justice—and maybe other areas of the law—are not yet known as Oklahoma negotiates with tribes in wake of the verdict.

Oklahoma Voters Narrowly Approve Medicaid Expansion that Republican Lawmakers Rejected

STATE AND LOCAL NEWS ROUNDUP | Oregon voters might decide on psychedelic mushrooms … Kansas City mayor says he received a death threat over mask requirements … Florida’s governor says state is not “going back, closing things.”

Covid Pandemic Jeopardizes Vote On Oklahoma Medicaid Expansion

Advocates are concerned that turnout for the summer primary election could be hampered by fears of contracting Covid-19 at voting stations and by Republican Gov. Kevin Stitt’s about-face on the issue.

‘Double Whammy’: Oil Crash Adds to Virus Budget Woes in Some States

Alaska is dealing with some especially tough financial issues. In Louisiana, one lawmaker says: "It's just kind of the perfect storm with the coronavirus and the collapse of oil and gas."

Bruises from Coronavirus Begin to Show on State Budgets

Recent days have seen spending reductions and downbeat revenue forecasts.

In Tornado Alley, Storms Are Even More Dangerous For People With Disabilities

Some advocates say the federal or state government needs to step in and help people with disabilities acquire their own storm shelters.

Remote Workers Moving to Tulsa? Foundation Doubles Down on Recruitment Efforts

The Remote Tulsa program is now offering $10,000 to 250 people to move to the Oklahoma city for a year, citing success in its first year.

Judge Rules all U.S. Cities, Counties Have Stake in Opioid Settlements

U.S. District Judge Daniel Polster’s ruling broadens the scope of participants in the ongoing multi-district litigation brought against prescription drug companies.