Washington D.C.

Employers in D.C. Region Expect Some Remote Work Into Mid-2021, Survey Finds

About 60% of respondents anticipated less than a third of workers would return to the office by early September because of coronavirus risks. Some are planning for a portion of staff to still be working remotely even next summer.

City Creates Food Stamps App as Renewal Process Becomes More Difficult

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is resuming pre-coronavirus application and renewal requirements for food stamps. Washington, D.C. created a mobile public benefits app that officials hope will make it easier for recipients to apply and meet eligibility requirements.

U.S. House Approves D.C. Statehood for First Time in History

The historic vote in the House of Representatives will be met with opposition in the Senate.

Did Curfews Work? Cities Begin to Roll Back Restrictions

Police say curfews helped quell violence as they begin to lift restrictions, but civil liberties advocates say that they are actually used to stop peaceful protests.

Pandemic, Civil Unrest Complicate Voting in the Nation’s Capital

Washington, D.C. is among the jurisdictions that encouraged residents to vote by mail to stay safe amid the coronavirus pandemic, but voters who came out to the polls Tuesday still encountered long lines.

When Cities Don’t Accept Cash For Public Services

This year saw a wave of backlash against cashless retail, but what about when cities like Washington D.C. want to move toward all-digital payments?

D.C.’s Hard Road to Safer Streets

As the District lagged on its Vision Zero goals, bike and pedestrian advocates in Washington turned traffic fatalities into a rallying cry, and got results.

To Lower Maternal Mortality, One City Is Thinking Holistically About Women’s Health

Washington, D.C. is trying a variety of strategies to reach women before, during, and after their pregnancies.

Tech Giants Fight Digital Right-to-Repair Bills

The measures would require manufacturers to supply parts to independent repair shops.

D.C. City Council Considers End to ‘Gay Panic’ Legal Defense

Two bills would prohibit a legal defense for murders or attacks that relies on what many consider to be a discriminatory view of the LGBTQ community.

A 51st State? The District of Columbia Aims for Its Star

Washington, D.C. leaders made their case for statehood at the first U.S. House of Representatives hearing on the issue in 25 years, while Republicans raised concerns about corruption and fiscal stability.

D.C. Mayor Argues for Statehood Ahead of Congressional Hearing

“This is taxation without representation, in practice, in the capital of the free world,” Mayor Muriel Bowser said.

What to Do with All This Broken Stuff? Cities Aim to Help People Fix It

Across the country, municipalities are helping residents repair mendable belongings, keep material out of landfills and save money.

Scoot Aside E-Scooters, Rental Mopeds Are Zooming In

Cities involved in the pilot say the mopeds will provide an environmentally-friendly and affordable option for commuters. Some are worried about the safety implications, though.

Recalling Local Officials Is An ‘Intense, Scrappy Challenge’

In Washington D.C., an attempt to recall a city council member shows how difficult it is to organize this kind of campaign at a local level.

Ranking America's Small and Large Cities

Washington D.C. jumped six spots in this year's America's Best Cities rankings, which judge cities on 23 metrics sorted into six categories.

Washington, D.C. Could Allow People in Prison to Vote

One council member will propose that the nation’s capital become the first place to restore voting rights to people who are currently serving time in prison.

Washington, D.C. Considers Allowing Residents to Issue Parking Tickets

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Albuquerque considers charging for car crash costs … St Louis County may require landlords to accept housing vouchers … Montana provides student loan aid to young farmers.

Risk Assessments Used in Criminal Justice Systems Too Often Clouded By Bias, Report Says

A new report questions the widespread use of risk assessment tools. But one city says their system proves algorithms can be implemented fairly.