Washington D.C.

Hackers Steal Washington, D.C. Police Files, Threaten to Release Data

Ransomware threats are nothing new to local governments, but experts say this one poses significant risk to officers and ongoing investigations.

For States’ Covid Contact Tracing Apps, Privacy Tops Utility

Nearly half the states have or are planning to launch a digital contact tracing system, but critics say the technology has overemphasized privacy at the cost of usefulness.

The Hours Americans Reclaimed by Sitting Less in Traffic

As the pandemic cut the amount of commuters and other motorists on the road last year, drivers nationwide saved over 3 billion hours compared to 2019, according to new estimates.

For Cities, Less Traffic Means Lost Revenue

Cities have seen parking fee and traffic fine collections drop during the pandemic as commuters and tourists stay home and enforcement is relaxed.

Airbnb Cancels Rentals in Washington, D.C. Region for Inauguration Week

The company’s decision to cancel and block lodging rentals comes after leaders from the District, Maryland and Virginia urged people to stay away.

Capitol Riot Response Could Have Differed if D.C. was a State

With Democrats assuming control of the Senate, Washington, D.C. could have a better shot at statehood. The District’s mayor wants to see urgent action on the issue.

D.C. Orders 6 p.m. Curfew to Restore Order After Chaos at U.S. Capitol

By evening the Capitol building was secure, after a pro-Trump mob broke in earlier in the day.

These Cities Tried to Tackle Disinvestment. Here Are Lessons From What Happened.

Local governments have made efforts to revive commerce in neglected Black neighborhoods around the country. It hasn’t always worked. But cities can learn from their experiences.

People Convicted of Crimes as Young Adults May See a Chance at Early Release in D.C.

A veto-proof majority of the D.C. City Council passed a bill to open early release to people convicted of crimes they committed before they were 25, saying they deserve the chance for rehabilitation. Victims’ advocates are skeptical.

San Francisco and D.C. Transit Agencies Consider Big Layoffs, Service Cuts

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Grocery stores with pharmacies buying medical-grade freezers for vaccines … Virginia looking for citizen members of its new redistricting commission … California governor denies parole for Manson follower.

Ahead of Thanksgiving, Cities See Surge in Demand for Covid Tests

Leaders in San Francisco warned the city’s testing capacity is being overrun by people looking to travel, and urged people to just stay home.

First Came Legal Marijuana, Now Comes…Magic Mushrooms?

In some places where the marijuana decriminalization and legalization movement took hold, voters are being asked a new question: Should psychedelic mushrooms be next?

One City's Pilot Program to Restart Live Entertainment

Six venues in Washington D.C. will be allowed to hold live performances under strict guidance and supervision from city officials.

Employers in D.C. Region Expect Some Remote Work Into Mid-2021, Survey Finds

About 60% of respondents anticipated less than a third of workers would return to the office by early September because of coronavirus risks. Some are planning for a portion of staff to still be working remotely even next summer.

City Creates Food Stamps App as Renewal Process Becomes More Difficult

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is resuming pre-coronavirus application and renewal requirements for food stamps. Washington, D.C. created a mobile public benefits app that officials hope will make it easier for recipients to apply and meet eligibility requirements.

U.S. House Approves D.C. Statehood for First Time in History

The historic vote in the House of Representatives will be met with opposition in the Senate.

Did Curfews Work? Cities Begin to Roll Back Restrictions

Police say curfews helped quell violence as they begin to lift restrictions, but civil liberties advocates say that they are actually used to stop peaceful protests.

Pandemic, Civil Unrest Complicate Voting in the Nation’s Capital

Washington, D.C. is among the jurisdictions that encouraged residents to vote by mail to stay safe amid the coronavirus pandemic, but voters who came out to the polls Tuesday still encountered long lines.

When Cities Don’t Accept Cash For Public Services

This year saw a wave of backlash against cashless retail, but what about when cities like Washington D.C. want to move toward all-digital payments?

D.C.’s Hard Road to Safer Streets

As the District lagged on its Vision Zero goals, bike and pedestrian advocates in Washington turned traffic fatalities into a rallying cry, and got results.