Author Archive

Andrea Noble

Andrea Noble is a Staff Correspondent at Route Fifty. She most recently worked as an investigator for the House Energy and Commerce Committee through a fellowship with the Project on Government Oversight. Previously, she covered law enforcement and the Justice Department for The Washington Times and local government in Maryland for The Gazette.
Public Safety

Justice Department Dubs New York, Seattle, and Portland as ‘Anarchist Jurisdictions’

The three cities were flagged for “permitting anarchy, violence and destruction” as part of the Trump administration’s bid to cut funding to cities where recent protests over racial injustice and police brutality have occurred.

Tech & Data

After Decision Upholding FCC’s 5G Rules, Cities Now Weighing Appeal

The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals largely upheld FCC rules limiting local government’s ability to regulate 5G infrastructure and cap fees. Cities involved in the case have until Sept. 28 to file an appeal, but some experts say the ruling wasn’t all bad.

Tech & Data

How the Coronavirus Pandemic Fueled Ransomware Attacks

Speaking at a cybersecurity summit, federal law enforcement officials said hackers have exploited the public health crisis to launch new attacks.

Finance

New York Tax On Opioid Drug Makers Revived By Federal Appeals Court

A ruling by the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals overturns a lower court decision that axed a state tax that would require drug companies to pay hundreds of millions to help cover the cost of the state’s response to the opioid epidemic.

Infrastructure

Two Months Out from Election Day, Ohio Nailing Down Vote-By-Mail Procedures

Officials decided Monday the state will not pay for postage on absentee ballots, and a pending appeal will determine whether voters can request absentee ballots by email.

Management

States Sue EPA Over Chesapeake Bay Pollution Reduction Plans

A group of states say New York and Pennsylvania are not doing enough to reduce water pollution and arguing the federal government is letting them get away with it.

Finance

Governors Plead with Congress for Help as Senate Rejects Skinny Relief Bill

As Democratic governors testified before the House Committee on Financial Services, the Senate rejected a pared-back coronavirus relief proposal.

Management

Key States Face Poll Worker Shortages, Congressional Report Warns

A report by Democrats on the House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis analyzed the election preparations of four states and warned that a failure to recruit enough poll workers will lead to long wait times on Election Day.

Finance

Senate to Vote on Slimmed-Down Coronavirus Relief Bill This Week

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell introduced the legislation Tuesday and said the Senate will hold a vote on it this week.

Tech & Data

States Experiment with Automation to Bolster Cybersecurity

A new pilot program overseen by Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory hopes to cut down on the time it takes for governments to respond to potential cyber threats by automating the process.

Finance

Legal Experts Say Trump’s Push to Defund ‘Anarchist’ Cities Would Face Difficulty in Court

The president lost several legal battles in attempting to enforce a previous order to restrict so-called “sanctuary cities” from receiving federal grants.

Finance

Senate Republicans’ Revamped, Scaled-Back Coronavirus Bill Expected Next Week

But Democrats and Republicans are still far apart on inclusion of money for state and local governments.

Health & Human Services

USDA Extends Free School Meal Program for Children

The U.S. Department of Agriculture loosened requirements for children receiving free meals through their schools at the start of the coronavirus pandemic and announced Monday it would keep those flexibilities in place through the end of the year.

Tech & Data

Sewage Testing on University Campus Identifies Asymptomatic Covid Cases

The University of Arizona tested sewage for the presence of coronavirus and identified two students who tested positive but didn’t have any symptoms for the respiratory illness.

Tech & Data

Ransomware Attacks Demanding Larger Payouts from Local Governments

The average ransom demanded of a local government in a cyberattack grew from $30,000 to $380,000, according to one cybersecurity firm.

Finance

New Unemployment Benefits Could Take Weeks to Distribute

Thirty-two states have been approved for the federal unemployment program, but only four states have begun issuing the $300-a-week benefits.

Management

Judge Sides with Florida Teachers in Lawsuit Over Reopening Schools

The judge found that local school officials, not the state, should be able to determine when students and teachers resume in-person classes.

Tech & Data

City Creates Food Stamps App as Renewal Process Becomes More Difficult

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is resuming pre-coronavirus application and renewal requirements for food stamps. Washington, D.C. created a mobile public benefits app that officials hope will make it easier for recipients to apply and meet eligibility requirements.

Management

A Showdown Over Returning to the Classroom

An Iowa school district and teachers union have sued the governor over her mandate requiring schools to reopen for in-person instruction.

Management

Universities Suspend Students, Bust Parties to Enforce Covid-19 Rules

Some universities are reconsidering their decisions to hold in-person classes amid the coronavirus pandemic while others are cracking down on student life.