Start protecting the nation’s digital identities today

GettyImages/ Vertigo3d

Connect with state & local government leaders
 

Connecting state and local government leaders

An abstraction layer that sits between the sources of identity data and its consumers makes it possible to discover and understand identity data without disrupting existing operations.

Almost every element of our lives is now digitized. Modernizing the infrastructure has enabled organizations to work more efficiently and drive down costs, but it has also provided bad actors with larger attack surfaces and vastly more access points from which to exploit IT systems. This is particularly problematic for government agencies—long desired targets for both criminal and nation state advanced threat actors.

The Biden administration’s wide-reaching cybersecurity executive order issued last year was a critical first step toward removing barriers to threat information sharing between public and private sectors and creating a standardized playbook for responding to cyber vulnerabilities and incidents.

The zero trust architecture specified in the executive order directly defends against credential threats. Implementing a least privilege access approach requiring users to undergo additional risk-based verification brings access decisions into near real-time. It evaluates granular attributes relating to the user and covers endpoint data, risk scoring, environmental factors and rich user profile data.

An operational zero trust architecture also requires organizations to have accurate visibility into the identities of all objects in their system and a robust set of accurate attributes and relationships for these objects in order to make valid authorization decisions.

Unfortunately, there are challenges inherent in modern IT networks that make the path to a viable zero trust architecture difficult. Beyond the sprawl of identities, different systems and sources of truth for these identities are basically incompatible. Most organizations underestimate the complexity of their identity environment and do not account for how that will impact security design and implementation, their deployment timeline and the burden on internal resources.

For government agencies, the challenges of shifting to a zero trust architecture are exponentially greater. The sheer number of siloed systems, applications and departments presents a barrier to generating momentum. Many mission-critical systems still in use were developed over decades by teams long since departed, with little knowledge of the design or operations retained. The lack of a comprehensive understanding of the functions and dependencies of each platform creates additional roadblocks, compounded by the scale of operation—millions of employees, contractors and citizens, each with multiple accounts on disparate systems. Crowning of this mountain of resistance is the distributed nature of management throughout the government. In order to manage effectively, departments and agencies have subdivided control and accountability.

So, how is progress being made?

The “zero trust” concept has jump-started conversations around IT modernization for government agencies. The National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence at the National Institute of Standards and Technology began working diligently to create recommended zero trust architecture models for government and private sectors using commercial-off-the-shelf services. Recognizing that zero trust is a cooperative effort, identity and security software companies are working together.  Most importantly, the industry, analysts and pundits have agreed that zero trust is not a single solution, but an evolution.

The key to any journey is first knowing where to start. Remembering that the underlying challenges to implementing zero trust are a lack of understanding of current systems and a distributed and siloed control of assets, what’s needed is an abstraction layer that sits between the sources of identity data and the consumers of that identity data.

By adding this layer, it’s possible to discover and understand the nature of identity data in the environment without disrupting existing operations. This process can start small and gradually incorporate more and more identity data, building a richer and increasingly visible understanding of the identity landscape.

In this escalating war to defend assets and operations, adopting a zero trust architecture is a generational jump forward that builds a foundation of rich flexible and security identity data—an essential early step on the journey to stronger security, higher assurance and less risk.

X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.