Courts

Two Cities Took Different Approaches to Pandemic Court Closures. They Got Different Results

Did closing courts contribute to the resurgence in violent crime that began in 2020? What happened in Albuquerque, New Mexico, and Wichita, Kansas, may provide clues.

Without Obergefell, Most States Would Have Same-Sex Marriage Bans

The Roe v. Wade ruling has lawmakers returning to an issue many thought was settled law.

Supreme Court Deals a Major Blow to the EPA, and All Federal Agencies

A decision from the court's conservative majority limits agencies' ability to write new rules on major issues. The case centered on a challenge brought by West Virginia and other states.

Guard, Reserve Troops Can Sue States for Firing Them, Supreme Court Rules

Court declares that state powers yield to federal ones when it comes to raising armies.

Why the Supreme Court’s Football Coach Decision is a Game-changer on School Prayer

COMMENTARY | The case is noteworthy because the court has now decided that public school employees can pray when supervising students.

State Courts From Oregon to Georgia Will Now Decide Who—If Anyone—Can Get an Abortion

COMMENTARY | There's likely to be a flood of litigation as people try to invalidate state laws on abortion.

The Next Chapter for Battles Over Abortion in the States

The Supreme Court's overturning of Roe v. Wade promises to bring a new wave of debate to statehouses on the issue, as conservatives move to restrict the procedure and liberals look to protect access. Meanwhile, anti-abortion activists say their work isn't finished.

Lawsuits Over Miranda Violations Blocked by Supreme Court Ruling

The 6-3 decision does not eliminate the the rights. But legal experts say it will make it harder to hold law enforcement accountable if they don't provide the warning, which is meant to protect people taken into custody against self-incrimination.

The Legal Clash Over a City’s Landmark Natural Gas Ban

Since Berkeley, California prohibited gas connections to most new buildings, dozens of cities have followed suit with similar policies. Now, a federal appeals court will decide whether the local statute is allowed under federal law.

The Looming Battle Between States if Roe Falls

Lawmakers in some GOP-controlled legislatures are pushing laws that would go after women who seek abortions in other states. Democratic lawmakers are promising to provide a safe harbor.

'This Was Not a Surprise': How the Pro-Choice Movement Lost the Battle for Roe

In the wake of a leaked draft opinion indicating the Supreme Court plans to overturn Roe v. Wade, Joshua Prager, author of “The Family Roe,” discusses the 50-year battle over abortion rights and the strategic decisions that led us here.

Supreme Court Sides Against Boston in Christian Flag Dispute

The case centered on the First Amendment and a flagpole outside of City Hall.

Supreme Court Steps Into a Fight Over State Permitting Power

An order from the high court means that Trump-era guidelines imposing new limits on state authority to approve or deny energy infrastructure projects will remain in effect as the Biden administration works on a rewrite of the rules.

Reckless Drivers in This City Could Lose Their Cars

A newly proposed Milwaukee ordinance targets repeat offenders by taking them to civil court and establishing their behavior as a "public nuisance.”

The Indictment of the Nation’s Longest-serving Legislative Leader

The federal prosecution of former Illinois House Speaker Mike Madigan is the latest, and biggest, development in a push to crack down on corruption in Chicago.

In Mississippi, Another Push to Ease Restrictions on Divorce

The change would make things easier for someone trying to end a marriage against their partner’s wishes.

What to Watch For in State Legislatures in 2022

State legislative sessions in election years can sometimes be sleepy affairs, but not this year. Here are the big issues they'll be addressing.

Legislators Return to Session No Longer Able to Use Shortcut for Passing Bills

In a victory for government reform groups, Hawaii state lawmakers cannot employ “gut-and-replace” amendments to speed along bills.

Technology Use in Courts Skyrockets, Challenging Those Without Internet Access

Starting in March 2020, all 50 states and Washington, D.C., began offering video hearings, despite having no history of remote civil court proceedings.

States Ask Supreme Court to Consider Challenge Over SALT Cap

It's the latest development in a case that four states have brought against the $10,000 limit on the state and local tax deduction.