Management

The Worker Shortages Plaguing the Public Sector

There are a variety of reasons New York is struggling to maintain essential services.

Boston Will Elect Someone Other Than a White Man as Mayor for the First Time

Michelle Wu and Annissa Essaibi George, both women of color, will advance to the two-person general mayoral election set for November 2.

Electric Vehicles Poised to Rev Up Government Fleets

Fleet electrification barriers have been reduced by technology breakthroughs, federal funding and grants, but challenges remain for cities and states.

Deploying the National Guard to Fill a School Bus Driver Shortage

Schools across the country are finding it difficult to recruit and retain school bus drivers.

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Eliminate Manual Processes Route and Approve Invoices from Anywhere

Today’s finance teams carry a heavy burden, supporting everything from growth strategies to long-term planning – all while continuously delivering monthly and quarterly numbers and keeping cash flowing. But even as demands on finance departments grow, many still spend excessive time using paper, spreadsheets, and e-mails to process vendor invoices, approvals, and payments.

The Future of State Versus State Cases at the US Supreme Court

Two justices have made clear that they believe the court is neglecting too many of the disputes.

He Left a War-Torn Country as a Refugee and Went on to Become a US Mayor

Helena, Montana Mayor Wilmot Collins came to the United States in 1994 from Liberia. His life journey is a true immigrant success story.

Packaging Generates A lot of Waste – Now Maine and Oregon Want Manufacturers to Foot the Bill For Getting Rid of It

COMMENTARY | Packaging for consumer products represents a large share of U.S. solid waste, and barely half of it is recycled.

Lyft and Uber Establish Legal Funds to Protect Drivers from Texas Abortion Law

The ride-booking companies said they would cover legal fees if their drivers are sued under the state’s new law, which allows private citizens to file lawsuits against anyone who “aids and abets” a woman in obtaining an abortion after six weeks of pregnancy.

$15,000 Signing Bonuses and $130,000 Salaries for Police Recruits

Pandemic restrictions and other factors, more than the defund the police movement after George Floyd's death, has forced police departments nationwide to refocus on how they reach potential candidates.

Survey: Half of Business Travelers Leaning Toward Canceling Trips

The downturn in business travel continues to plague hotels and other businesses and could be a drag on some city economies.

The Secret to Happiness at Work

COMMENTARY | Your job doesn’t have to represent the most prestigious use of your potential. It just needs to be rewarding.

One City’s Inventive Plan to Spark Employee Collaboration, Loyalty and Retention

Each of the five analysts hired as a team in San Rafael, California, will be based in a different department, but they’ll train and work together on special projects.

State Officials to Drone Operators: Please Stop Harassing the Animals

Wildlife officials in Colorado this week urged recreational drone pilots to avoid disrupting animals during flights, the latest example of a growing issue for state agencies.

Mayors Wade Into Contentious Labor Law Debate

A U.S. Conference of Mayors panel moved to endorse a federal bill meant to strengthen workers rights, that is drawing strong pushback from business groups.

The Era of Easier Voting for Disabled People Is Over

Thanks to absentee ballots, drop-off boxes, and curbside voting, people with disabilities turned out in record numbers in the 2020 election. That’s likely to change.

Only 11% in Rental Assistance Spent, Treasury Department Prepares to Reallocate Unspent Aid

State and local rental assistance programs have doled out little of the $46.5 billion in emergency rental assistance and jurisdictions that don’t disperse money soon could have to return it.

New York City Council Aides are Officially Unionized, After 21-month Campaign

The Association of Legislative Employees is now the country’s largest legislative staff group in organized labor.

The Public Sector Retirement Explosion

COMMENTARY | For years, human resources officials worried about an alarming exodus of government retirees. Now it’s here—and it's because of Covid-19.

The Plantation and the Pizza Hut: A Suburban County Reconsiders Its History

Fairfax County, Virginia wants to add unheard voices to its story. That will require changing the way it gathers and evaluates historical information.

The States Where Unemployment Claims Have Shrunk the Least and the Most

The biggest gainers are in the South and the Great Plains and the losers are everywhere.