Philadelphia

Pennsylvania’s New Vote-by-Mail Law Expands Access for Everyone Except the Poor

In America’s poorest big city, language barriers, unstable housing and lack of internet access make voting by mail difficult. So low-income Philadelphia residents will be voting in person, if at all.

Pennsylvania’s New Vote-by-Mail Law Expands Access for Everyone Except the Poor

In America’s poorest big city, language barriers, unstable housing and lack of internet access make voting by mail difficult. So low-income Philadelphia residents will be voting in person, if at all.

Philadelphia

State and Local Officials Seek to Reassure Voters about Potential Poll Watcher Intimidation

Following President Trump’s call to his supporters to deploy themselves as poll watchers, state and local government officials are working to ensure that voters can cast their ballots without intimidation.

From Jacksonville to Louisville, Confederate Statues Are Coming Down

Calls to remove the statues, denounced as symbols of white supremacy, were reignited in the wake of national protests against police brutality and the death of George Floyd.

Municipal Workers in One City Unite to Call for Higher Taxes Instead of Layoffs

The effort in Philadelphia involves both union and non-union employees and comes as city elected leaders are trying to solve a budget shortfall caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

Tear Gas Is Way More Dangerous Than Police Let On—Especially During the Coronavirus Pandemic

In the middle of a respiratory pandemic, law enforcement agencies have used tear gas in especially dangerous ways. The chemical agent also seeps into homes, contaminates food, furniture, skin and surfaces, and can cause long-term lung damage.

What’s Next for Fiscal Oversight in Philadelphia?

COMMENTARY | Experts and officials debate future of agency that has played key role since 1992.

Supreme Court to Hear Dispute Over Same-Sex Foster Parents

Catholic Social Services is fighting Philadelphia’s decision to stop working with the foster agency because it will not place children with same-sex couples.

With Safe Injection Sites, ‘Somebody Has to Go First.’ It Could Be Philadelphia.

Overdose deaths are a daily occurrence in many Philadelphia neighborhoods.

Supervised Injection Site Does Not Violate Federal Drug Law, Judge Rules

The decision could have ramifications throughout the country, as policymakers weigh whether to open facilities where people can take opioids and other illegal drugs.

City Sued Over Sidewalk Accessibility for People With Disabilities

The plaintiffs in the case want Philadelphia to take steps to upgrade ramps and cut down on obstructions.

Soda Taxes Lead Some to Cut Down on Sugary Drinks, Fizzle With Others

But the full cost of the taxes does appear to be getting passed to consumers in at least two cities.

A New Legal Battle Over Cash Bail

Civil rights advocates allege defendants are stuck in Philadelphia jails as court officials flout state guidelines.

Philly Mayor Deleted Years of Text Messages

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | W.Va. teachers strike … Alaska cold case leads to arrest in Maine using genetic genealogy … and the Cincinnati City Council’s attendance record.

Feds File Lawsuit to Stop 'Safe Injection' Site for Drug Users

A Philadelphia non-profit, with the support of city leaders, has been moving forward with a plan to open a facility where they said drug users could more safely use heroin and other illegal opioids.

‘No Silver Bullet’ for Opioid Crisis in Philadelphia, Other Urban Areas

A mix of education, treatment, and other measures shows promise, experts say.

S&P Nudges Philadelphia's Credit Rating Downward

The city's finances face pressure from public employee pensions and added public school costs are on the horizon.

Ways Cities Can Avoid Paying to Translate the Same Sentences Repeatedly

Here’s how Philadelphia and Bowling Green, Kentucky keep their translation service costs down.

A Bitter Legal Fight Over a Philadelphia Soda Tax Could Decide the Future of Sugar Taxes in the US

Legal battles can be expensive to tax payers and time consuming for city and state legal departments. Philadelphia has been at loggerheads with the industry for almost two years, racking up legal fees north of $1.4 million.

Philadelphia Tries to Thwart Exuberant Eagles Fans With New Substance

The city hasn't been able to control sports fans with Crisco previously, so crowd-control planners tried this instead.

Philadelphia’s Mayor Touts a Holistic Strategy to Ending Gun Violence

But Jim Kenney also warns his fellow mayors that “without the help of federal and state governments in education and job training and addiction services, we’re never going to turn the corner.”