Philadelphia

Philadelphia's Mayor Opens Up About His Proudest Moments in Office – and His Biggest Mistakes

In an exclusive interview, Mayor Jim Kenney talks about the city's soda tax, gun violence, Covid-19 and his plans for the future.

In Pennsylvania, GOP State Lawmakers Look to Impeach Philadelphia District Attorney

Republicans in Harrisburg say crime goes “unchecked” under Larry Krasner, the city’s progressive top prosecutor

The Rise of Tiny House Villages in the Fight Against Homelessness

More cities are turning to the small-sized structures as an alternative to group shelters. But critics have likened them to "sheds" that fall well short of permanent affordable housing.

67% of Cities Plan to Use ARPA for Lost Revenue

Cities are more likely to use money to replace lost tax revenues than to spend on infrastructure, according to a National League of Cities report.

Why States Have Been Slow Paying Out Billions in Federal Rental Aid

Congress approved over $46 billion to help cover overdue rent. Struggling households and frustrated landlords are still waiting on the money.

Major US Cities Face Challenging Budget Shortfalls, Report Shows

The Pew Charitable Trusts studied 13 major cities and found they face fiscal 2021 budget shortfalls of up to 17%, and they are using creative methods to try to balance their budgets.

Pandemic-Paused Plastic Bag Bans Ripped Anew by Critics

Philadelphia’s bag ban was delayed due to the pandemic, which has derailed similar bans across the country. Eight states have anti-plastic bag laws on the books.

The Hours Americans Reclaimed by Sitting Less in Traffic

As the pandemic cut the amount of commuters and other motorists on the road last year, drivers nationwide saved over 3 billion hours compared to 2019, according to new estimates.

Proposed Safe-Injection Site in Philadelphia Found Illegal by Federal Appeals Court

The U.S. Third Circuit Court of Appeals issued a 2-1 decision that found a plan to open the nation’s first supervised drug injection site violates a federal law passed to shut down crack houses.

A City Looks to Incorporate More, and More Diverse, Input Into Its Budget Process

Philadelphia this week announced a participatory budgeting program for a $1 million pot of money, as well as other initiatives geared toward reducing racial inequities with city spending.

Judge Rules Cities’ Muni Bond Rate-Fixing Lawsuit Against Big Banks Can Proceed

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | One Republican governor says he voted for Joe Biden … Federal judge strikes down “public charge” rule … Oil clean up on Maryland and Delaware beaches.

Supreme Court to Consider LGBTQ Rights and Foster Care the Day After Election

The case, which concerns a taxpayer-funded Catholic adoption agency, could make a big impact on LGBTQ rights and force changes in government contracting practices with religious organizations.

Philadelphia Imposes Curfew, Calls National Guard to Quell Violence Over Police Shooting

STATE AND LOCAL ROUNDUP | Thousands in Oklahoma City are without power after an autumn ice storm… The Justice Department launches probe of New Jersey veterans’ homes… New study says a flu shot could reduce the risk of catching Covid-19.

Pennsylvania’s New Vote-by-Mail Law Expands Access for Everyone Except the Poor

In America’s poorest big city, language barriers, unstable housing and lack of internet access make voting by mail difficult. So low-income Philadelphia residents will be voting in person, if at all.

State and Local Officials Seek to Reassure Voters about Potential Poll Watcher Intimidation

Following President Trump’s call to his supporters to deploy themselves as poll watchers, state and local government officials are working to ensure that voters can cast their ballots without intimidation.

From Jacksonville to Louisville, Confederate Statues Are Coming Down

Calls to remove the statues, denounced as symbols of white supremacy, were reignited in the wake of national protests against police brutality and the death of George Floyd.

Municipal Workers in One City Unite to Call for Higher Taxes Instead of Layoffs

The effort in Philadelphia involves both union and non-union employees and comes as city elected leaders are trying to solve a budget shortfall caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

Tear Gas Is Way More Dangerous Than Police Let On—Especially During the Coronavirus Pandemic

In the middle of a respiratory pandemic, law enforcement agencies have used tear gas in especially dangerous ways. The chemical agent also seeps into homes, contaminates food, furniture, skin and surfaces, and can cause long-term lung damage.

What’s Next for Fiscal Oversight in Philadelphia?

COMMENTARY | Experts and officials debate future of agency that has played key role since 1992.