Cleveland’s ‘Jock Tax’ Faces Big Setback in Court

Chicago Bears linebacker Hunter Hillenmeyer (92) is seen in action against the Cleveland Browns during an NFL football game in Chicago, Sunday, Nov. 1, 2009.

Chicago Bears linebacker Hunter Hillenmeyer (92) is seen in action against the Cleveland Browns during an NFL football game in Chicago, Sunday, Nov. 1, 2009. Nam Y. Huh / AP Photo

 

Connecting state and local government leaders

The way Ohio’s second-largest city taxes out-of-town athletes sparked a lawsuit by two former NFL players.

In a ruling handed down Thursday, the Ohio Supreme Court declared that the way the city of Cleveland’s collects its “jock” tax on out-of-town professional athletes is unconstitutional but rejected arguments that the controversial tax should be scrapped in its entirety.

As the Northeast Ohio Media Group reports, the ruling could cost Ohio’s second-largest city at least $1 million in jock tax revenue annually.

The basis of the lawsuit, filed by two former NFL players, hinges on Cleveland’s method of assessing its a 2 percent local income tax on visiting athletes based on the total number of games played in the city and dividing it by the total number of games in the season.

The plaintiffs, Hunter Hillenmeyer and Jeff Saturday, argued that the city should factor in the total number of annual work days, which include job duties like practices and team meetings, with number of games played in the city.

“Due process requires an allocation that reasonably associates the amount of compensation taxed with work the taxpayer performed within the city,” Justice Judith Ann Lanzinger wrote in in a unanimous decision. “By using the games-played method, Cleveland has reached extraterritorially, beyond its power to tax. Cleveland’s power to tax reaches only that portion of a nonresident’s compensation that was earned by work performed in Cleveland. The games-played method reaches income for work that was performed outside of Cleveland, and thus Cleveland’s income tax violates due process as applied to NFL players such as Hillenmeyer.”

According to Northeast Ohio Media Group:

Of the eight U.S. cities that have a jock tax – Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus, Detroit, Kansas City, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, and St. Louis – only Cleveland has been using a "games-played" formula.

Cleveland argued that the "games-played" method is fair because NFL athletes are paid for one thing: to play in games. Attorneys for Cleveland also argued that the city has the power to make its own decisions about how to charge taxes, as long as its policies are reasonable.

Beyond those eight cities, many state governments assess their own jock taxes. As Stateline, an initiative of the Pew Charitable Trusts, reported last October:

All but nine states have income taxes, but as Stateline reported [in 2013], some of them have exemptions for short-term visits. States and cities that do levy the jock tax calculate it in one of two ways. Most states count “duty days,” or the total number of days an athlete works for the team, including games, practices, team meetings and other team-related activities. Then the state calculates the number of days the athlete engaged in those activities in that state, calculates the percentage of the athlete’s income earned there, and taxes that amount at the state’s rate for high income earners (the bracket into which most professional athletes fall).

Michael Grass is Executive Editor of Government Executive's Route Fifty.

NEXT STORY: Peoria’s ‘Budget Challenge’ Puts Residents in the Driver’s Seat

X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.