Health & Human Services

The Prosecutors Not Planning to Enforce Post-Roe Abortion Laws

In states like Texas and Tennessee, some local district attorneys say they’re not willing to pursue cases against women who get abortions, or doctors who provide them.

Public Health Workers Still Fighting the Pandemic, Even as Policy Makers Move On

"It's not over," warns Dr. Georges Benjamin of the American Public Health Association in an interview with Route Fifty.

States Have Yet to Spend Hundreds of Millions of Federal Dollars to Tackle Covid Health Disparities

A year ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention awarded states and local health departments $2.25 billion to help people of color and other populations at higher risk from Covid. But a KHN review shows public health agencies across the country have been slow to spend it.

Online Data Could be Used Against People Seeking Abortions if Roe v. Wade Falls

COMMENTARY | Women in states where abortion becomes illegal who rely on the internet for information, products and services related to reproductive health would be subject to online policing.

Sponsor Content

New Tools Help State and Local Governments Battle Ransomware, Other Big Disasters

When governments find themselves being ransomed, their choices are typically to pay, which will undercut their ability to deliver key services to their communities due to budget restrictions, or not pay, resulting in the immediate inability to serve their communities and the loss of key data that will inevitably plague them for years afterwards.

Republican State Lawmakers Prepare to Quickly Limit Abortion Access if Roe v. Wade Is Overturned

Through the courts, new bills and special sessions, Republican state lawmakers are working to make sure they are ready to limit access as soon as is legally permissible.

States are Taking Action to Rein in Prescription Drug Prices

A New Jersey bill capping out-of-pocket expenses for insulin and asthma inhalers is among the latest proposals. Broader efforts remain bogged down in Congress.

Influx of Calls to Suicide Prevention Hotline Could Test Some States

The 988 emergency phone system has widespread support. But its launch comes after decades of lagging investment overall in mental health services.

A City Seeks to Undo a Legacy of Trauma

A Baltimore law requires agencies that interact with children and families to receive training in trauma-informed care. It's changing how the city engages with residents, with a greater emphasis on healing rather than hardline policies.

The Looming Battle Between States if Roe Falls

Lawmakers in some GOP-controlled legislatures are pushing laws that would go after women who seek abortions in other states. Democratic lawmakers are promising to provide a safe harbor.

Deadly Bird Flu Sweeps States, Straining Farmers

Millions of poultry have been killed in the 29 states affected by the avian flu.

States Offer Supplemental Wages to Retain Child Care Workers

COMMENTARY | Ensuring eligible employees enroll to receive the pay benefit can be a challenge. New research offers three strategies that can help.

Distrust Keeps Families on SNAP From Buying Groceries Online

COMMENTARY | When buying groceries online, families eligible for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits are less likely to purchase both healthy foods, like fruits and vegetables, and sweets, a new study shows.

A Three-Phase Strategy to Reduce Homelessness

COMMENTARY | As cities grapple with rising homelessness, states struggle to distribute relief money. But change is within our grasp.

Cities With the Worst Air Pollution in the US

More than 40% of people live in places with unhealthy air quality, according to a recent report.

Staring at an Image of Yourself on Zoom Has Serious Consequences for Mental Health – Especially for Women

COMMENTARY | Mirrors, selfies and knowing other people are looking at you all cause people to think of themselves as objects. Video calls are all three in one and are likely increasing the harms of self-objectification.

Cities Pick up Pace on Reparations Efforts, and Controversy Follows

Localities are devising programs to provide redress for racial discrimination. But implementing them has brought out the critics.

The Most Livable Cities in the US

AARP published an index that measures how “livable” communities nationwide are, and ranks the top ones that meet residents' needs as they grow older.

Why Pandemic Food and Medicaid Benefits Could Soon an End

The federal government is again extending a health emergency keeping the extra aid in place, but this could be the last time.