Management

In an era of divisiness, some politicians are trying to change the tone

At an event last week hosted by the National Governors Association, Justices Amy Coney Barrett and Sonia Sotomayor spoke about how they have learned to disagree agreeably.

West Virginia’s top election official on trust, social media and secure elections

Ahead of what promises to be a hectic election season, Secretary of State Mac Warner spent part of his last National Association of Secretaries of State Winter Conference touching on conspiracy theories, among other topics.

More places install drop-off boxes for surrendered babies. Critics say they’re a gimmick.

States began passing so-called safe haven laws more than two decades ago. But critics argue that however well-intended, baby boxes don't address the real problems facing parents and newborns.

Governors roundly condemn Alabama ruling that effectively halts IVF

Republican leadership in the state is working on legislation that would narrow the impact of the ruling after several Alabama fertility clinics halted the procedures.

Sponsor Content

Eliminate Manual Processes Route and Approve Invoices from Anywhere

Today’s finance teams carry a heavy burden, supporting everything from growth strategies to long-term planning – all while continuously delivering monthly and quarterly numbers and keeping cash flowing. But even as demands on finance departments grow, many still spend excessive time using paper, spreadsheets, and e-mails to process vendor invoices, approvals, and payments.

Feds preach vigilance amid multiple physical, cyber threats against election officials

In response, agencies as varied as CISA and the Postal Inspection Service are offering a slew of free and low-cost resources in a bid to help states and localities keep issues under control.

As millions wait on food stamp approvals, feds tell states to speed it up

To adequately staff safety net programs, some states are boosting workforce funding, and others are investing in new computer systems to speed up claims processing. But food security advocates say recent backlogs are a symptom of long-term disinvestment.

Releasing suspects pretrial doesn’t lead to higher crime rates, experts say

Some states and jurisdictions are taking different approaches to cash bail.

Trust in government, and opportunities to rebuild it

Confidence in state and local government may have been waning in recent years, but there are ways communities can help to bolster their resident’s faith in them.

No fare! Free bus rides raise questions of fairness, viability.

The strategy is especially helpful to lower-paid workers, but it might not be sustainable.

States look to rein in ballot initiatives with more ballot initiatives

Ballot measures in recent years have been used to expand Medicaid, preserve abortion rights and raise minimum wages. Now, state lawmakers are turning to them to put more restrictions on the process.

Dead smoke alarms, moldy rooms, empty first aid kits: Farmworkers endure unsafe and substandard housing across US

The federal government requires all states to inspect housing for temporary agriculture workers annually, but only some states inspect known migrant labor camps.

Cities pay a climate penalty as air pollution worsens

Communities vulnerable to deteriorating air conditions and the resulting public health issues may find it ever more difficult to adapt to the changing environment, a new report suggests.

California prison drug overdoses surge again after early treatment success

Drug overdose deaths in California state prisons rebounded to near record levels last year, a big setback for corrections officials who thought they were on the right track with medication-assisted treatment efforts. Officials blame fentanyl.

How trusted are state and local governments?

Confidence in lower levels of government may be better than in the federal government, but it’s still not nearly good enough. And that stands in the way of state and local leaders’ ability to get things done.

Oregon's experiment in drug decriminalization failed. Advocates blame the state's political leadership.

Just over three years since Oregon voters passed Ballot Measure 110, elected officials want to repeal key elements, blaming the law for open drug use and soaring overdoses. But it’s their own hands-off approach that isn’t working, advocates say.

Real-world experiments in messaging show that getting low-income people the help they need is more effective when stigma is reduced

COMMENTARY | The stigma around poverty and government benefits can make those initiatives less effective.

Washington’s key climate law is under attack

In 2023, the state’s Climate Commitment Act generated more than $2 billion for projects to clean up transportation, shift to clean energy and help communities adapt to the effects of a changing climate. But this fall, voters will get a chance to shut it all down.

Cities know that the way police respond to mental crisis calls must change. But how?

Cities are experimenting with new ways to meet the rapidly increasing demand for behavioral health crisis intervention, at a time when incidents of police shooting and killing people in mental health crisis have become painfully familiar.

Today’s real-time wildfire data helps prepare for a changing climate

Rapid response and early detection data tools are helping agencies paint a clearer picture of incoming wildfire risks.

Active shooter training: State-specific requirements for schools and law enforcement

No states mandate annual active shooter training for police officers, according to an analysis by The Texas Tribune, ProPublica and FRONTLINE. In comparison, at least 37 states require such training in schools, typically on a yearly basis.