As Rioters Storm U.S. Capitol, States See Protests

People attend a rally in support of President Donald Trump at the State Capitol in Lansing, Mich., Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021.

People attend a rally in support of President Donald Trump at the State Capitol in Lansing, Mich., Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021. AP Photo/Paul Sancya

 

Connecting state and local government leaders

A crowd of President Trump's supporters forced their way into the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Protests at statehouses remained less volatile.

As a mob of President Trump’s supporters broke into the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, state capitals across the country saw so-called “Stop the Steal” protests, driven by baseless claims of election fraud that the president has promoted in recent weeks.

The state gatherings were largely organized on Facebook and Parler, a social media website used by conspiracy theorists and extremists. As of Wednesday evening, none of the protests at the state level had turned nearly as violent or chaotic as what happened in D.C.

In Salem, Oregon, protesters burned an effigy of Gov. Kate Brown. Trump supporters and others who gathered there mid-day were later met by counter-protestors. The two sides clashed and police declared the situation an unlawful assembly. Oregon State Police confirmed at least one arrest for harassment and disorderly conduct.

Pro-Trump demonstrators also gathered in Washington’s state capital, Olympia. A crowd assembled in the afternoon at the Capitol campus, some waving American flags and others Trump flags.

Video posted online by multiple reporters at the scene in Olympia and a news outlet showed a group at one point breaching a gate and entering the governor's mansion grounds. Police moved in, ordered them to disperse and eventually cleared people from the area.

Gov. Jay Inslee, a Democrat, said later in the evening that he and his wife were doing "just fine."

“I revile these acts of sedition and intimidation that we've seen in our nation today," he added.

Meanwhile, a journalist for The Olympian covering the event reported that a man with a gun directed a death threat at her and other members of the media. There was gunfire at two political protests in Olympia last month, wounding at least one person.

Although most of the state protests around the country Wednesday stayed outside, protesters did enter at least two capitol buildings.

In Kansas, news station KSNT reported a crowd in the rotunda remained peaceful and broke up within a few hours. The protesters were allowed in due to inclement weather, according to the Kansas Highway Patrol's Capitol Police.

Protesters also entered the Iowa Capitol building where they chanted “hold the line” and “drain the swamp.”

As the situation in D.C. became more intense, some state and local officials chose to clear out of government buildings.

The New Mexico state House speaker ordered the evacuation of the Capitol building during a Legislative Council meeting.

Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, who Trump pressured to change the results of the election in his state, left with his staff from their offices when armed protesters arrived at the Capitol.

The Republican governor of Georgia, Brian Kemp, called the events at the U.S. Capitol "a disgrace and quite honestly un-American." He said he'd extend an executive order activating the state's National Guard and that he had been discussing safety measures with lawmakers for the state's upcoming legislative session, which starts Monday.

"We have to come together in this state and in this country," he added.

In Texas, the Department of Public Safety closed the state Capitol grounds just before 2 p.m., with the agency saying it did so “out of an abundance of caution” as dozens of protesters gathered in Austin.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock ordered city agencies to close municipal buildings early for the day, saying that about 700 people had gathered downtown near the Colorado state Capitol. But as of mid-afternoon there were no reports there of major unrest.

Demonstrators in Arizona set up a guillotine outside the state Capitol, mirroring a similar display outside the U.S. Capitol building in D.C. 

Minnesota State Police put up barriers and blockades around the statehouse. Rhode Island increased police presence at its Capitol, too.

Trump supporters in Ohio were met by counter-protesters. Members of the far-right white nationalist organization Proud Boys briefly clashed with anti-Trump protesters in Columbus.

DeJuan Sharp, an anti-Trump protester, told The Columbus Dispatch it was hypocritical police were not firing tear gas on the Proud Boys as they had on Black Lives Matter protesters who came to the capital in June following the death of George Floyd

Protest activity also occurred Wednesday in the capitals of Arkansas, Michigan, Nevada, and Utah, among other places.

By around 6 p.m., officials announced that the U.S. Capitol was secure. Congressional lawmakers later reconvened to resume the process of counting electoral votes that had been disrupted by the earlier siege.

This story has been updated with additional information.

X
This website uses cookies to enhance user experience and to analyze performance and traffic on our website. We also share information about your use of our site with our social media, advertising and analytics partners. Learn More / Do Not Sell My Personal Information
Accept Cookies
X
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Do Not Sell My Personal Information

When you visit our website, we store cookies on your browser to collect information. The information collected might relate to you, your preferences or your device, and is mostly used to make the site work as you expect it to and to provide a more personalized web experience. However, you can choose not to allow certain types of cookies, which may impact your experience of the site and the services we are able to offer. Click on the different category headings to find out more and change our default settings according to your preference. You cannot opt-out of our First Party Strictly Necessary Cookies as they are deployed in order to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting the cookie banner and remembering your settings, to log into your account, to redirect you when you log out, etc.). For more information about the First and Third Party Cookies used please follow this link.

Allow All Cookies

Manage Consent Preferences

Strictly Necessary Cookies - Always Active

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data, Targeting & Social Media Cookies

Under the California Consumer Privacy Act, you have the right to opt-out of the sale of your personal information to third parties. These cookies collect information for analytics and to personalize your experience with targeted ads. You may exercise your right to opt out of the sale of personal information by using this toggle switch. If you opt out we will not be able to offer you personalised ads and will not hand over your personal information to any third parties. Additionally, you may contact our legal department for further clarification about your rights as a California consumer by using this Exercise My Rights link

If you have enabled privacy controls on your browser (such as a plugin), we have to take that as a valid request to opt-out. Therefore we would not be able to track your activity through the web. This may affect our ability to personalize ads according to your preferences.

Targeting cookies may be set through our site by our advertising partners. They may be used by those companies to build a profile of your interests and show you relevant adverts on other sites. They do not store directly personal information, but are based on uniquely identifying your browser and internet device. If you do not allow these cookies, you will experience less targeted advertising.

Social media cookies are set by a range of social media services that we have added to the site to enable you to share our content with your friends and networks. They are capable of tracking your browser across other sites and building up a profile of your interests. This may impact the content and messages you see on other websites you visit. If you do not allow these cookies you may not be able to use or see these sharing tools.

If you want to opt out of all of our lead reports and lists, please submit a privacy request at our Do Not Sell page.

Save Settings
Cookie Preferences Cookie List

Cookie List

A cookie is a small piece of data (text file) that a website – when visited by a user – asks your browser to store on your device in order to remember information about you, such as your language preference or login information. Those cookies are set by us and called first-party cookies. We also use third-party cookies – which are cookies from a domain different than the domain of the website you are visiting – for our advertising and marketing efforts. More specifically, we use cookies and other tracking technologies for the following purposes:

Strictly Necessary Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Functional Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Performance Cookies

We do not allow you to opt-out of our certain cookies, as they are necessary to ensure the proper functioning of our website (such as prompting our cookie banner and remembering your privacy choices) and/or to monitor site performance. These cookies are not used in a way that constitutes a “sale” of your data under the CCPA. You can set your browser to block or alert you about these cookies, but some parts of the site will not work as intended if you do so. You can usually find these settings in the Options or Preferences menu of your browser. Visit www.allaboutcookies.org to learn more.

Sale of Personal Data

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Social Media Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.

Targeting Cookies

We also use cookies to personalize your experience on our websites, including by determining the most relevant content and advertisements to show you, and to monitor site traffic and performance, so that we may improve our websites and your experience. You may opt out of our use of such cookies (and the associated “sale” of your Personal Information) by using this toggle switch. You will still see some advertising, regardless of your selection. Because we do not track you across different devices, browsers and GEMG properties, your selection will take effect only on this browser, this device and this website.